Yule Time

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Yule comes from a name for a 12-day festival, celebrated by Germanic peoples, around the winter solstice in December and January.

The word yule develops from the geōl, with cousin forms in such other Germanic languages as Old Norse and Gothic.

The tradition of yule logs has its roots in pagan rituals. Northern Europeans, like Vikings, celebrated the Festival of Yule to honor the winter solstice by journeying into the woods in search of a hearty oak tree.

Yule also carries associations with a farm animal. The Yule goat carried Father Christmas on his back and is a symbol of Christmas throughout Scandinavian countries.

The Yule goat may have associations tracing back to Norse mythology. The now-famous comic book god Thor rode in a chariot pulled by two goats that could also be eaten and magically regenerated into living creatures again.

According to tradition, what must be used to light a yule log?
A piece of last year’s yule log

According to tradition, what must be saved from the yule log?
A piece of wood to light next year’s yule log

When must a yule log be lit?
12 days before Christmas

When must a yule log be selected?
Candlemass

Who brought the yule log custom to England?
Scandinavian invaders